Behavioral issues in schools on the rise in the Kansas City metro and nationwide

These days more school children than ever are having behavioral disruptions in class.This is National School Guidance Counselor’s week, and schools tell KMBC those counselors are needed more now than ever before.”I really like my job. It’s awesome being around these kids all the time,” said Scott Hayes. Hayes does a lot of things at Silver City Elementary School; participates in cafeteria duty, helps with the bus line and fills in as an emergency substitute in class. But mainly, as the Silver City School counselor, he teaches students how to work through their emotions. There are a lot of those emotions these days. On Thursday, Hayes was in Ms. Mynett’s classroom, teaching second graders about compassion.”Is it overwhelming? Absolutely,” he said. “You are trying to catch up two years’ worth of remote learning, hybrid learning and inability to have those character development opportunities.”School personnel must overcome a huge gap in social learning now, not to mention catch kids up on all the academics they may have missed due to remote learning.”They don’t know what it’s like to interact with other students – period,” Hayes said. “Some of our kids that are in second grade, the last time that they had a full year of school is when they were in kindergarten. Their interactions could include hitting each other, punching each other, pinching. They’re trying to create a relationship without any idea what that looks like.””We want to continue with the academic push that we’ve always done. But we do it with lots of care,” principal Zaneta Boles said.A lot of that care is brought by Hayes. He checks with families and makes sure they have what they need to be successful, such as rental assistance and food. “We do have to meet those needs first,” Boles said, “because the academics and social needs go hand in hand.”Because 300 Silver City Elementary students won’t be able to learn history or reading or anything else if a student isn’t emotionally ready to listen to an adult.Here’s how you can help your students at home: Reinforce what the schools are teaching. If the teacher asks families to spend extra time on math or read 20 minutes a night, it may very well be because there isn’t enough time in the school day to do it.Boles also said that schools appreciate transparency from families; call if there is a death in the family or some sort of upheaval. The schools can adjust a student’s day around those concerns. Because if a student is concerned about a hospitalized family member or a looming move, that will impact their ability to learn in the classroom.

These days more school children than ever are having behavioral disruptions in class.

This is National School Guidance Counselor’s week, and schools tell KMBC those counselors are needed more now than ever before.

“I really like my job. It’s awesome being around these kids all the time,” said Scott Hayes.

Hayes does a lot of things at Silver City Elementary School; participates in cafeteria duty, helps with the bus line and fills in as an emergency substitute in class.

But mainly, as the Silver City School counselor, he teaches students how to work through their emotions. There are a lot of those emotions these days. On Thursday, Hayes was in Ms. Mynett’s classroom, teaching second graders about compassion.

“Is it overwhelming? Absolutely,” he said. “You are trying to catch up two years’ worth of remote learning, hybrid learning and inability to have those character development opportunities.”

School personnel must overcome a huge gap in social learning now, not to mention catch kids up on all the academics they may have missed due to remote learning.

“They don’t know what it’s like to interact with other students – period,” Hayes said. “Some of our kids that are in second grade, the last time that they had a full year of school is when they were in kindergarten. Their interactions could include hitting each other, punching each other, pinching. They’re trying to create a relationship without any idea what that looks like.”

“We want to continue with the academic push that we’ve always done. But we do it with lots of care,” principal Zaneta Boles said.

A lot of that care is brought by Hayes. He checks with families and makes sure they have what they need to be successful, such as rental assistance and food.

“We do have to meet those needs first,” Boles said, “because the academics and social needs go hand in hand.”

Because 300 Silver City Elementary students won’t be able to learn history or reading or anything else if a student isn’t emotionally ready to listen to an adult.

Here’s how you can help your students at home: Reinforce what the schools are teaching.

If the teacher asks families to spend extra time on math or read 20 minutes a night, it may very well be because there isn’t enough time in the school day to do it.

Boles also said that schools appreciate transparency from families; call if there is a death in the family or some sort of upheaval. The schools can adjust a student’s day around those concerns. Because if a student is concerned about a hospitalized family member or a looming move, that will impact their ability to learn in the classroom.

https://www.kmbc.com/article/behavioral-issues-in-schools-on-the-rise-in-kansas-city-area/39040134

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